Symbols

Yellow Dragon of the Center

中心黃龍 · [ zhōngxīn hung​lóng ]

The yellow dragon of the center is one of the five heavenly beasts, one of the fundamental symbols in the Taoist cosmology and the five elements. Among all the different, Chinese dragons he plays the first fiddle.

The yellow dragon (sometimes referred to as yellow snake) is considered as god and guardian of the element earth, the center, heaven and the sun. He embodies the most powerful dragon, depending on his goodwill there will be a rich harvest or a poor crop, life or death. The yellow dragon is the master of all dragons and as such he is invincible.

4000 years ago, this celestial creature gave a ride to heaven to a brave emperor and donated wind and rain the people. Similar to that myth it is said, that the legendary emperor Huang Di attended immortality at the end of his reign and transformed into a yellow dragon, ascending to heaven. Since then, Chinese emperors are considered as the earthly representative of the Huànglóng (yellow dragon). The use of the figure was reserved to them alone. Often the appearance of the yellow dragon is accompanied with lotus flowers: The concentric petals of the lotus symbolize perfectly the function of the element earth: Everything revolves around a center, expands and carries the power of transformation. The perfect jewelry for our divine, yellow dragon.

 

> Usage of the symbol

The five celestial beasts are very powerful. As a representative of the center and the element earth the yellow dragon is best placed in the central quadrant of your home. For more tips pleas look up the articles earth and center.

For more information about the five elements/phases and the five celestial animals please read the article:
> Five elements

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